Peppermint

£4.00

Mentha x piperita is a natural hybrid of Mentha spicata and Mentha aquatica. Its dark, green leaves have a characteristic sweetish, strong scent and an aromatic, warm, pungent taste, with a cooling aftertaste. It’s probably the most important commercial aromatic herb in the world, believed to have been first cultivated in ancient Egypt, although its official cultivation record begins in England in 1750. Since then, peppermint oil has developed a wide application in the flavouring of food, drinks and pharmaceutical preparations. At home, the plant’s leaves and flowers can be dried for teas or used in stews and sauces.  

Common name Peppermint
Latin name Mentha x piperita
Variety Common
Quantity 50 seeds
Plant size Height: 70 cm
Width: 70 cm
Container size Height: 30 cm
Width: 30 cm
Companion plant(s) Radish, onions, carrot, tomatoes, aubergines, peppers
Planting outdoors Apr to Jun
Germination 10 to 15 days
Harvesting 60 to 90 days
Planting 5 cm apart at 0.5 cm depth
Thinning 10 cm between plants
Light Full sun to partial shade
Soil Well-drained, light and moist soil
Watering Regular, heavy watering
Feeding Not required
Caring Peppermint generally grows best in moist, shaded locations, where it expands quickly through its underground rhizomes. However, consider growing it in containers, as this bully plant could become hard to control over time.
Beneficial wildlife Attracts bees and other butterflies.
Pests Repels aphids
Harvesting Pick mint leaves individually only as needed. If you aren’t using the mint immediately, place the stems in a glass of water for three to seven days to preserve scent and flavour.
Eating Medicinal properties: Peppermint is a popular traditional remedy for several conditions.

How to eat: Mint can be consumed raw to get the maximum aroma, or steep the leaves in hot water for a few minutes to make a soothing mint tea. Toss leaves into fresh fruit salad or add them to salad dressings and marinades. Prepare classic mint sauce to add to peas or lamb recipes. Dry leaves for later use.
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